[Fluid Mechanics Seminar] Rapid area change in biological swimming and flying : A ubiquitous feature of high-performance maneuvering yet to break through into the engineering world

Date : June 16, 2017 (Friday), 3:00 ~ 4:00 pm
Place : E1 Seminar room(#3213)
Speaker : Prof. David E. Rival (Queen’s University)
Rapid area change in biological swimming and flying : A ubiquitous feature of high-performance maneuvering yet to break through into the engineering world

Abstract

Animals manipulate their shape at time scales like no engineered device today. This feature allows them to generate and control instantaneous forces and moments of dramatic proportions. We start by reviewing added mass and vorticity-growth concepts before defining the shape-change number, which encapsulates this exotic feature of biological propulsion. Subsequently we look at the fluid mechanics associated with rapid area change in the form of two-dimensional and three-dimensional perching abstractions all the while contrasting to traditional unsteady problems with fixed area. We will then end with some speculation as to the path forward with this research and how such features might lend their way into engineering design.

Bio

Dr. Rival’s doctoral studies on the aerodynamics of dragonfly flight were completed at the Technische Universitaet Darmstadt in Germany. He then moved to Boston for a postdoctoral stint at MIT exploring rapid area change and vortex manipulation on unsteady propulsors. Before moving to Queen’s, Dr. Rival served on faculty at the University of Calgary for four years. His lab balances the development of novel post-processing techniques of Eulerian and Lagrangian data (pressure, force, structure identification, etc) with the study of bio-inspired propulsion, unsteady aerodynamics, wind and hydro power, and large-artery hemodynamics.

Host : 기계공학과 김대겸 교수 (Tel.3218)

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